Hospitality @ Home: Polishing

August 21

Polishing is one of the most common sidework tasks in a restaurant. Every glass and piece of silverware must be buffed free of water spots before it goes into the dining room. Polishing can be a tricky business, but it is worth doing and home, and worth doing well.

First and foremost, it is easiest to get a good polish on silver and glassware if you buff them when they are freshly washed, mostly dry, and STILL WARM from the washing water.

Secondly, the best cloth for polishing is one that will not leave lint on the glasses. Micro fiber is good here, but I prefer an old fashioned cotton or linen flour sack. Your polishing cloth should also be large enough that you can cover both of your hands and the item you are polishing can move freely within in it. If your cloth is puny, that is ok, just grab a second one. The important thing is that your pesky fingertips are covered, and that the polishee can move freely between your clothed hands.

Now, we begin.

Swath your hands with the polishing cloth (or cloths), and hold the item in your non-dominant hand– i.e. if you are right handed, hold the item in your left hand. Create a “lobster claw” around the item to be polished by placing it between yout thumb and four fingers. Buff in firm circular strokes until spots are removed.

If some spots are stubborn, you can soften them by holding the spotted bit over a glass of steaming hot water and allowing the steam to cloud the glass or silver for a moment. Polish that section quickly; the spots should lift easily.

When polishing the bowl of stemmed glasses, be careful to hold the glass hear the base of thebowl, NOT the foot of the stem. that is a surefire way to break the stem off a glass.

If you get in the habit of polishing your glasses and silver as soon they are washed, you’ll always have a sparkling glass for your sparkling wine 😉

Recipe: Pescado Los Feliciano

It is not all pies and Mac n’ cheese molded into giant mozzarella sticks around the Sidework househould. Most of the time I try to eat healthfully.

This dish evolved out of a Pescado Veracruzano that was on the menu at a restaurant I managed several years ago. The restaurant dish featured a feared fish filet atop a bed of rice surrounded by a rich broth packed with lime, onion, olives, oregano and tomatoes. It was delicious.

So I took that idea and amped up the nutritional density by switching out the rice for quinoa and adding the ubiquitous southern california hippie brassica du jour, kale. Thus the name, Pescado Los Feliciano, after the arty-crunchy LA neighborhood where I live.

The result is a forgiving dish that is sustaining yet light, comforting yet healthful. It comes together easily for a weeknight dinner but is impressive enough to serve for company. If you are overcoming a cold, dial up the lemon and garlic and let the steamy broth carry it into your bones. This truly is a go to dish for me.

For a vegetarian version, I double the quinoa and turn it into fritters. Then serve an island of fritters in a rich vegetable stock. Continue reading

Hospitality @ Home: Basic Wine Knowledge

Forget all the frippery associated with the pairing of wine; I am going to let you in on a little secret.

The best wine to have with any meal is the one you most enjoy.

Most of us do not have such refined palates that we notice the unique interplay of the flavor compounds in wine with those in the food alongside. Most of us operate on the mode of food is good, wine is good, food and wine are good together.

Some folks enjoy steeping themselves in the vast ocean of wine possibilities. If you are one of those people, great! But for everyone else, here are a few wine guidelines that will rarely lead you astray:

1. Pair like with like. White meat-white wine, red meat- red wine, sweets – sweet wine.

2. Look at the body. Rich dishes, sauces- full bodied wine, light fare- light bodied wine. A handy list:

Red wine varietals from lightest to fullest bodied:

European Pinot Noir- Chianti- US & Australian Pinot Noir- Malbec- Merlot – Syrah- Zinfandel- Cabernet Sauvignon

White wine varietals from lightest to fullest bodied:

Pinot Grigio- Chenin Blanc- European Sauvignon Blanc- US & Australian Sauvignon Blanc- European Chardonnay- California Chardonnay

2. When in doubt, order champagne. Sparkling wine compliments nearly everything. (One of my favorite combinations in the world is french fries and champagne).

Hospitality @ Home: Picking a potluck dish

It’s the season for cookouts, and if you are anything like me, you cannot go to someone’s house without bringing something to contribute. But what to bring?

Here are a couple of tips for potluck and cookout dishes:

1Bring a dish that you know is delicious. Even if,  when you ask the host what you can bring, you end up with a course you don’t immediately have a dish for (salad duty when you are a baker at heart, or vice versa), don’t just wing it. Ask friends for a surefire, vetted recipe (you can hardly go wrong with anything from Cooks Illustrated or Serious Eats), or order something from a local bakery or beloved restaurant that you know is great. It doesn’t matter if a potluck dish is made by your own hands, so long as some level of care went into it’s preparation and it is tasty. Sometimes, the best thing to make is a to-go order. And that’s ok.

2Bring serving utensils for your dish. You can tie your utensils to your casserole dish with a length of twine, but don’t try to serve a tray of macaroni with a flimsy single use picnic fork. It will only end in tears, and potentially in white plastic shrapnel invading your lovely casserole.

3Bring something that can sit at room temperature for a couple of hours. If it is over 75 degrees, avoid anything with mayonnaise or shellfish or both. Alternately, you can sub vegan mayonnaise or pesto on pretty much any sandwich preparation where regular egg-based mayo gives you pause.

4Avoid icings that can melt. Like whipped cream or light butter creams. If possible, avoid icings at all if the event is outside, as they mostly serve to attract bees and wasps. But if you must use a butter cream, be sure to stiffen it with lots of confectioner’s sugar. The greater the sugar to butter ratio, the less likely it is to melt.

5When in doubt, bring beverages. Wine, beer, Sangria, a big old batch of pre-mixed margaritas. Vodka watermelon. Or go teetotal with a nice sweet tea, lemonade, or fruity minty, virgin bramble.

Here are some ideas for great Potluck/ cookout dishes that are more creative than a casserole—

Kale Salad : https://wherethesideworkends.com/2013/05/08/hospitality-home-kale-salad/#more-914

Greek salad: https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/greek-salad-105279

Ribs: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2016/06/oven-barbecue-bbq-ribs-recipe.html

Pan Bagnat: https://food52.com/recipes/6896-pan-bagnat-le-french-tuna-salad-sandwich

Pressed sandwiches of any kind, like a Mufaletta

Brownies, blondes, cookies, hand pies

Pasta Salad: http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/06/how-to-make-the-best-pasta-salad.html

Sangria: https://wherethesideworkends.com/2010/12/13/hospitality-home-holiday-sangrias/

Margaritas: https://wherethesideworkends.com/2012/05/25/hospitality-home-batch-margaritas/

Fresh fruit lemonade: https://wherethesideworkends.com/2012/06/21/more-than-you-ever-wished-to-know-about-lemonade/