Restaurant 101: Server

Servers. Waiters. So ubiquitous that it seems silly to “define” what a server is, but here we go.

A server is a lot of things, a factotum with an incredible memory, an entertainer, a clairvoyant, an efficiency expert, a marathon walker, a dextrous tray carrier.

But more than anything, a server is a diplomat. She arrives at your table with menus and wine lists- the restaurant’s first offer. Your party tells her what sort of experience you are looking for at this table tonight. She creates a plan to make that happen seamlessly and negotiates with the chef or bartender on your behalf (if necessary). She bears rudeness with grace, and navigates wayward toddlers as she picks the smoothest paths between kitchen, bar, service station, and your table.

Servers are responsible for extensive knowledge of the menu components so they can advise which dishes will accommodate dietary restrictions or allergies. They must know how long dishes take to cook and arrange the orders into courses that make logistical sense. Servers must know how to perform basic wine service and how to carry trays of beverages. They must be able to lift everything from porcelain and glass vessels as delicate as flower petals to magnums of wine. They must anticipate your needs before you do.

Hospitality @ Home: Polishing

August 21

Polishing is one of the most common sidework tasks in a restaurant. Every glass and piece of silverware must be buffed free of water spots before it goes into the dining room. Polishing can be a tricky business, but it is worth doing and home, and worth doing well.

First and foremost, it is easiest to get a good polish on silver and glassware if you buff them when they are freshly washed, mostly dry, and STILL WARM from the washing water.

Secondly, the best cloth for polishing is one that will not leave lint on the glasses. Micro fiber is good here, but I prefer an old fashioned cotton or linen flour sack. Your polishing cloth should also be large enough that you can cover both of your hands and the item you are polishing can move freely within in it. If your cloth is puny, that is ok, just grab a second one. The important thing is that your pesky fingertips are covered, and that the polishee can move freely between your clothed hands.

Now, we begin.

Swath your hands with the polishing cloth (or cloths), and hold the item in your non-dominant hand– i.e. if you are right handed, hold the item in your left hand. Create a “lobster claw” around the item to be polished by placing it between yout thumb and four fingers. Buff in firm circular strokes until spots are removed.

If some spots are stubborn, you can soften them by holding the spotted bit over a glass of steaming hot water and allowing the steam to cloud the glass or silver for a moment. Polish that section quickly; the spots should lift easily.

When polishing the bowl of stemmed glasses, be careful to hold the glass hear the base of thebowl, NOT the foot of the stem. that is a surefire way to break the stem off a glass.

If you get in the habit of polishing your glasses and silver as soon they are washed, you’ll always have a sparkling glass for your sparkling wine 😉

Restaurant 101: What’s in a Name?

Names of restaurants are more than merely assemblies of culinary words cleverly tossed together. The name of a restaurant can tell you everything from the hours of operation, the size of the staff, and how the wine will be presented.

I say CAN because– as with most things co-opted by American culture– sometimes the original intentions are lost. Like the word restaurant itself.

Initially, the name restaurant came from the name of a restorative broth that was served in 17th century Paris. In those days just before the French Revolution, many city-dwelling people took their meals at their neighborhood cook caterer’s dining room. Meals there were served family style at set times and every customer paid the same rate, whether or not there was still meat on the table by the time they sat at one of the communal tables. A salon de restaurant– salon of restoration– styled itself to capture the more discerning city-dweller, a rising middle class figure with a delicate constitution. There were many things that could lead to a delicate constitution– the fatiguing work of deep thought, the travails of living in close proximity to so many strangers, the damaging impacts of industrial fumes, the daily inhalation of foul vapors from a city that was till developing a sewage system– Parisians in such dire circumstances could restore themselves by supping on healthful consommes from the privacy of their own table, and pay only for what they consumed, a la carte. As the human constitution could find itself in need of restoration at any moment, restaurants themselves were often allowed to operate outside of the prescribed mealtimes that catering halls, by law, adhered to. What Parisian would deny Rousseau a cup of broth at 9pm when he had been so wrapped in thought about revolutionary ideas that he missed dinner?

I think of this foundation often when tasked to find a way to accommodate particularly daunting dietary restrictions and allergies in the dining room. It is, after all, the design of the institution itself to offer such patrons the restoration they seek.

But in general, here is a quick list of what you should expect from certain words and phrases in restaurant names:

What to expect from a–

Cafe: a casual venue with casual service, frequently a place with a menu heavy on the breakfast foods and coffee drinks. The same menu is typically served throughout the day, with business hours extending from early morning to late afternoon or early evening. Most cafes are not late night spots, and many rely on a counter service model where guests order and pay at a counter and food and drinks are delivered at the counter, or guests are given a number to take with them that ties them to their order.

Bistro: a casual restaurant with quick table service, usually specializing in french classic fare like Steak Frites and Moules Mariniere. A bistro (or bistrot) is boisterous, tables may be rather close together, and service will be casual. If you order a bottle of wine, it will be opened at your table and left there; don’t expect the server come by constantly to refill your glasses.

Brasserie: a slightly more upscale establishment originating in the Alsace region of France. Initially the Brasserie was intended to showcase the beer and wine of Alsace as well as the rich fare that compliments them. While the alcoholic distinction may have vanished slightly– most bistros and cafes have bars nowadays– many Brasseries do brew some of their own beer.

Chez X: roughly translated, chez means “In the home of” so Chez Fernand is to be “In the home of Fernand” where, presumably, things are done Fernand’s way. Fernand’s house, Fernand’s rules, oiui? A Chez restaurant can vary in service style, though most tend toward higher end service. There will be more service staff on hand, generally the dining room trinity of server-backwaiter-runner rather than more casual spots where the servers do most things with the support of a single busser.

Nouns: A restaurant that is merely a noun can be anything. As in The French Laundry is about is high end as it gets. But The Olive Garden is a casual family spot. There’s no real guidance here. Only a suggestion that you avail yourself of the google machine or the good old telephone to uncover things like menu style and dress code policies.

In higher end service, wine will be presented tableside, though likely opened at a side station and tasted by the sommelier or server to ensure it is ‘correct’ before it is poured for you, the wine will then be left at the side station and the staff will retrieve it to refill your glasses for you.

Other culinary traditions have their hierarchies as well. A sampling of a few, listed from most to least casual:

Japanese: Izakaya-Shokudo-Taishokuya-Kaiseki

Italian: pizzeria-Trattoria- ristorante- osteria

Recipe: Pescado Los Feliciano

AUGUST 7TH

It is not all pies and Mac n’ cheese molded into giant mozzarella sticks around the Sidework househould. Most of the time I try to eat healthfully.

This dish evolved out of a Pescado Veracruzano that was on the menu at a restaurant I managed several years ago. The restaurant dish featured a feared fish filet atop a bed of rice surrounded by a rich broth packed with lime, onion, olives, oregano and tomatoes. It was delicious.

So I took that idea and amped up the nutritional density by switching out the rice for quinoa and adding the ubiquitous southern california hippie brassica du jour, kale. Thus the name, Pescado Los Feliciano, after the arty-crunchy LA neighborhood where I live.

The result is a forgiving dish that is sustaining yet light, comforting yet healthful. It comes together easily for a weeknight dinner but is impressive enough to serve for company. If you are overcoming a cold, dial up the lemon and garlic and let the steamy broth carry it into your bones. This truly is a go to dish for me.

For a vegetarian version, I double the quinoa and turn it into fritters. Then serve an island of fritters in a rich vegetable stock. Continue reading

Restaurant 101: Sommelier

So Moll Yay.

So what is a so-moll-yay?

A wine expert. Some have accreditations from the Court of Master Sommeliers or the Wine and Spirits Education Trust, though some merely have battle-tested palates and an encyclopedic knowledge of oenology from the school of hard knocks.

Many sommeliers work for restaurants, actively designing a wine list that compliments the chef’s cuisine, creating accounts with wine vendors and keeping the the wine in stock. Restaurant sommeliers are active presences in the dining room during service, guiding guests through the wine list, ensuring not only that the selected wine will compliment the food that is ordered, but that it is free from flaws and served correctly (at the right temperature and in the correct stemware).

Increasingly though, sommeliers are seeking work as freelancers, creating wine lists and staff training procedures for several venues that do not employ a full time “somm.” Somms may also work for private collectors, maintaining their cellars and even sourcing wine to fill out a collection. They may also be employed at wineries or tasting rooms.

In addition to knowing an impossible amount about the daunting world of wine, somms also tend to have an expansive vocabulary that makes any bottle in their hands sound absolutely irresistible.

Hospitality @ Home: Basic Wine Knowledge

Forget all the frippery associated with the pairing of wine; I am going to let you in on a little secret.

The best wine to have with any meal is the one you most enjoy.

Most of us do not have such refined palates that we notice the unique interplay of the flavor compounds in wine with those in the food alongside. Most of us operate on the mode of food is good, wine is good, food and wine are good together.

Some folks enjoy steeping themselves in the vast ocean of wine possibilities. If you are one of those people, great! But for everyone else, here are a few wine guidelines that will rarely lead you astray:

1. Pair like with like. White meat-white wine, red meat- red wine, sweets – sweet wine.

2. Look at the body. Rich dishes, sauces- full bodied wine, light fare- light bodied wine. A handy list:

Red wine varietals from lightest to fullest bodied:

European Pinot Noir- Chianti- US & Australian Pinot Noir- Malbec- Merlot – Syrah- Zinfandel- Cabernet Sauvignon

White wine varietals from lightest to fullest bodied:

Pinot Grigio- Chenin Blanc- European Sauvignon Blanc- US & Australian Sauvignon Blanc- European Chardonnay- California Chardonnay

2. When in doubt, order champagne. Sparkling wine compliments nearly everything. (One of my favorite combinations in the world is french fries and champagne).

Restaurant Etiquette: Making Modifications

1. Keep in mind that some restaurants don’t allow modifications. If that bothers you, keep in mind that there are plenty of restaurants that do allow them, and you will probably be happier patronizing those establishments rather than stewing in a restaurant that you feel is not accommodating you.

2. And some dishes cannot be modified in the way you want them; if the steak has been marinated in an oil that contains garlic, it is impossible to alter that dish to accommodate a garlic allergy.

3. Speaking of allergies– don’t characterize an aversion to something as allergic to it. Calling something an Allergy sets off an array of protocols that stop the kitchen in their tracks. Grills and tongs may need to be washed in the moment, gloves donned, fresh plates brought from another part of the restaurant to prevent cross contamination. This delays service for every party in the restaurant, including yours. If you have set off all these protocols to accommodate your “gluten allergy” that is truly only a desire to avoid eating carbohydrates, don’t be surprised if every staff member in the dining room stares daggers in your direction when you order the banana cream pie for dessert with the excuse that “a little gluten is ok, I’m not that allergic.”

4. Be polite. Politeness goes a long way. Not that you won’t be helped if you are not polite, but it can make a difference in how hard the server negotiates on your behalf with the chef. In the heat of a service, a server may know that she only has three serious favors a shift to ask of the kitchen. She’s not going to go toe to toe with the sous-chef for a guest that was rude; she’ll take his initial ‘no’ and be happy for it.