Restaurant Etiquette: Credit Cards

December 4th

1. Don’t ask the server to decide which credit card to take at the end of meal. We’ve all seen and heard the haggling at a table after the check arrives. From “Are you going to let an old lady pay for dinner?” To “It’s his birthday, he can’t pay!” Imagine playing out this scene at a grocery store or dentist’s office and the absurdity becomes immediately clear. The cashier at the Kroger does not care who pays the bill; he will simply take the first form of payment handed to him. So too with restaurants (unless you are a regular, in which case we will generally always take your card regardless of when you hand it over.)

2. If it is important to you that you pay the check rather than someone else in your party, there are ways to arrange it. The easiest strategy is to arrive early for your reservation and slip your credit card to the server before your guests arrive. Alternately, many restaurants will allow you to leave a credit card days in advance if you are willing to complete a credit card authorization form so they can keep your card on file. As alluded in point 1, being a regular guest at an establishment generally ensures that the scales will be weighted in your favor in a credit-card duel.

3. If your party plans to split multiple ways, it is a good idea to bring cash. It is also a good idea to ask for separate checks BEFORE you order anything. This allows your server to organize the checks in advance so there is no confusion when the check arrives at the table.

4. Regarding check splitting, there are, in fact, apps like TAB which divide the tab for you, enabling your party to pay the bill with one credit card and settle up amongst yourselves later.

5. Get used to paying at the table. Credit and debit cards with chips in them encourage restaurants and other vendors to arrange payment systems that allow customers to keep the card on their person at all times. Besides making your credit card look like something from the Jetsons, they shift liability for fraudulent transactions to the “least secure” part of the payment pipeline, i.e.– onto the restaurant. So while some guests may find paying at the table rather rude, it is likely to become the new normal.

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